{download Textbooks} Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian FaithAuthor Peter E. Gillquist – Biorganicenergy.co

This Revised Edition Includes A New Epilogue, Coming Up On Twenty Five Years Since The Entry Of The Evangelical Orthodox Into The Holy Orthodox Church This Is The Story Of A Handful Of Courageous Men And Their Congregations Who Risked Stable Occupations, Security And The Approval Of Life Long Friends To Be Obedient To God S Call It Is Also The Story Of Every Believer Who Is Searching For The Church Where Christ Is Lord Where Holiness, Human Responsibility, And The Sovereignty Of God Are Preached Where Fellowship Is Than A Covered Dish Supper In The Church Basement And Where Fads And Fashions Take A Backseat To Apostolic Worship And Doctrine This Is A Book, For Orthodox Christians, Looking For Ways To Bring New Life To Their Own Churches It S Also A Book For Those Completely Dissatisfied Those On Their Own Search And It S A Book For Orthodox Christians, Looking For Renewal


5 thoughts on “Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian Faith

  1. mrs E. mrs E. says:

    Fascinating story of a group of American evangelicals search for the New Testament church which eventually led them to the Orthodox churchA bit dated though as transition happened 15 or so years ago


  2. comics.learningatcableworks.co.uk Customer comics.learningatcableworks.co.uk Customer says:

    I was once a non practicing Anglican then after being made Romanian Orthodox My world has changed with the love of god and by repeating the Jesus prayer has made my life pure This book helps you understand Orthodoxy and a very good book to read is Father Arseny all about his life this will help you to get the feel of being ChristianEmma


  3. Nathaniel Nathaniel says:

    As an Orthodox Christian, I found this book an interesting read it was refreshing to see the journey to the Ancient Faith as described by the Author I would recommend this to any protestant who is interested in the Ancient Faith The Author has a way of getting across the most relevant information in a clear and direct manner High level points were well made, diving only deep enough to have a sufficient understanding of these points, provides the reader with just enough context to understand the authors perspective as he describes his journey to the Ancient Faith.


  4. Labarum Labarum says:

    A most fascinating story in the renewal of historic Christianity is the strange case of a few thousand Evangelical Protestants converting en masse to the Antiochian Orthodox Church in 1987 Originally begun as yet another attempt by a group of Evangelicals to get back to the New Testament Church , they, unlike many such endeavors, studied Church history and discovered some unexpected things liturgy, bishops, sacraments, and various other beliefs and practices reeking of Catholicism.Becoming Orthodox is the story of this journey through the eyes of Peter Gillquist, one of the major players in the group, and details their growth from house Churches to an independent denomination and on to their final acceptance into Orthodoxy The book serves as Gillquist s answer to the question he poses early in the book whatever would possess two thousand Bible believing, blood bought, Gospel preaching, Christ centered, lifelong Evangelical Protestants to embrace this Orthodox faith so enthusiastically The book is divided into three sections detailing their disillusionment with Evangelicalism and their research leading them to believe the Orthodox Church was the Church of the New Testament, a summary and defense of Orthodox belief and practice, and the arduous process of joining Orthodoxy itself The presentation is enthusiastic, fast paced, and not overly critical to their former Evangelical homes The trek to Orthodoxy always is presented as a completion rather than a repudiation of the faith of their youth.Most interesting is the comparisons between Orthodoxy and the other contender for the historic Church Roman Catholicism In deciding between the Roman and Eastern expressions of historic Christianity, this unusual group of seekers compared the major disagreements between the two Churches with Rome in their eyes always coming up short However, this criticism is strictly within the context of determining which is the true New Testament Church There is no anti Roman bigotry or cheap shots at Catholics expense.It should also be pointed out that Orthodoxy does not always come out looking perfect either When they decided to become Orthodox, the leaders of the group by now called the Evangelical Orthodox Church traveled to Constantinople Istanbul to see the Patriarch and submit to the Orthodox Church In the strange politics of the Orthodox from which we inherit our less flattering definition of Byzantine , he refused to see them To this day, the rejection has never been explained and despite the final outcome some hurt is still evident in the account. The group later met with the Patriarch of Antioch who welcomed them into the Church, and they in turn have spearheaded many evangelistic outreaches for the Antiochian Archdiocese in America The overlapping jurisdictions are still a major problem for a strong Orthodox witness to the West and the political intrigue and ethnic divisions serve only to exacerbate the problem.A weakness in the book is a generally superficial treatment of the differences between Eastern and Western theological approaches There are differences in the starting points of the Orthodox view in relation to Western Churches The very project they embarked upon is analytical in nature and somewhat alien to the Orthodox ethos Gillquist acknowledges this somewhat but it is never fully fleshed out and one is left with Orthodox conclusions from Protestant methodology.Despite this issue, Becoming Orthodox presents a strong case for the Orthodox Church as a home for those discontented with the state of Protestantism It may even be the best starting point since the book is written in the style of many Evangelical Protestant witness books While it may leave some theological questions unanswered, the curious would have as accurate a view of the Orthodox Church and its intrigue as could be expected for an outsider.


  5. Arthur Digbee Arthur Digbee says:

    Protestant denominations and the Orthodox churches have a lot in common in terms of ecclesiastical organization, and a respect for how cultural differences can coexist within the universal church They differ enormously in terms of liturgy and its role, and liberal Protestants will find much to dislike in orthodox teaching At the same time, respect for national differences found in both traditions could help them move closer together.This is the story of a Protestant congregation that felt increasingly uncomfortable in its nondenominational tradition After researching alternative denominations, they surprised themselves by deciding to become Orthodox They would describe their journey a bit differently, but I read their story as illustrating two themes 1 a pull to liturgy and structure as a way to find God in the Church service and 2 comfort with socially and politically conservative teachings in the Orthodox church.Both they, and I, were surprised that they had to pick a flavor of Orthodoxy before they could complete the journey that is, they had to decide among Greek, Serbian, Russian, and other Orthodox traditions in the United States This is, it seems to me, the greatest obstacle to Orthodoxy in the US, and there is a clear need for a unified US Orthodox church that could respect these heritages while adopting to the North American context.This book won t tell you all that much about Orthodox doctrine and teaching, but it s an interesting personal account for open minded people interested in thinking outside whatever denominational box you happen to find yourself in.